Adding Content to the Skeleton, an Adapted Scrum Methodology

This week marks the beginning of adding real content to the skeleton site that I have been developing for Massachusetts HOSA. The content was provided to me in the form of a word document, with titles to differentiate between pages and sections. The first thing I did upon receiving this document was break the document down into individual user stories. I then created a Trello card for each story and placed the cards on the product backlog list. During this process, I was reading and building an understanding of the product owner’s vision for the website, as well as attempting to come up with potential acceptance criteria. I was also informally coming up with estimates for the amount of time and work that each story would take, but decided not to include these as part of the stories as it would offer minimal return on investment with me as the only developer. I looked at this process as a sort of modified Scrum Story Time meeting.

The next step was Sprint Planning, in which I plucked some of the story items that I saw as most important and placed them on the Sprint Backlog list. During my modified Story Time, I had already, for the most part, broken these stories down into small enough pieces to be worked on as tasks. This was the simplest way to handle breaking down the requirements, and is allowable because I’m the only one that is working on these tasks.

Once I felt that I had taken enough stories from the backlog to keep me busy for a week, I began work. This involved adding content in the form of text and images to existing blank pages on the skeleton website, as well as creating new pages as needed. Some of the story items involved formatting things like the footer and sidebar to achieve the desired effect. Throughout development, various questions arose.

Each time that I encountered something that I needed clarification on, I added a comment to the Trello card. For this reason (and many others), I really like using Trello cards to represent user stories and tasks. Using Trello also allowed me to attach images, checklists, tags, and mentions directed at specific users. I like the idea of keeping all of the relevant information about a specific user story in a single place rather than scattering it across email, in-person meetings, and Trello. I’ve been attempting to document any information passed through other communication channels into Trello so as to have a complete log of interactions.

I’m looking forward to getting into some more specific development on the site. Next week’s post will include a review and retrospective for this sprint.


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