Choosing a CMS

When choosing a content management system (CMS) to begin developing a website for myself or someone else, there are a few important considerations that must be made:

1. Who will be maintaining the website after development is finished?

I think that possibly the most important consideration that needs to be made when choosing a CMS for website development is who will be the one responsible for maintaining and updating the website once development is complete. Nothing is more frustrating than going on a beautifully designed website only to be faced with outdated and/or broken content. It does not matter how beautiful or complex the original design is if there is a need for dynamically updated content and nobody around who possesses the skill set required to make the changes or update the content.

2. What type of website is being built?

Another important consideration is the type of content that the website will serve. While many CMSs have support for multiple types of websites such as blogs, ecommerce stores, and static content sites, one may be better suited to a particular task than another. Choosing the right CMS for the job can make both the developer’s life easier and also create a more efficient, polished finished product.

3. How is the website being deployed?

In addition to considering how the website will be hosted and deployed, it is important to consider what the expected volume of traffic will be when choosing a CMS. If the expected volume is extremely high, then perhaps a cloud-based SaaS CMS is the best option. A cloud-based solution would allow for much easier load distribution and balancing and may be automatically handled by the platform itself. If volume is expected to be relatively light or the site is to be hosted locally, considerations must be made for the hardware/software support of the systems on which the site will be running.

4. Does the website need to integrate with existing infrastructure?

In addition to hardware/software considerations for deployment, another factor to think about is what types of IT infrastructure is already in place that will need to be integrated into the website. If there are already databases in existence, ensuring that the website will be able to integrate with them will save significant time and cost over having to migrate data between systems.

5. What kind of support is available for the CMS?

Whether it is for the developer, or for the client after development has been completed, what types of support and how easily accessible it is can be an important factor in deciding on a CMS. Are security patches regularly released so that the site will not be vulnerable? Is there a community that releases plugins, themes or other types of time-saving customizations for the CMS?

In deciding on which CMS to use for the development of the Massachusetts HOSA website, I considered these five points and decided on WordPress. My experience with WordPress as a CMS has been very positive, and I feel that choosing such a user-friendly CMS will allow for straightforward updating and maintaining of the website for many years to come. WordPress is flexible, powerful, and will be easy to scale should the needs of the organization change in the future.

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