Constructing a Curriculum

After recently completing a difficult, humbling and valuable phone interview for a position that I thought I was well qualified for, I decided to make a renewed effort in educating myself outside of the classroom. The discussion helped me to realize the areas where my skill set was lacking, and where to focus my educational efforts. While some classes offer information of a specific, desirable topic, I often find that I cannot find the exact topic that I want to learn as part of a course. I perform a quick search on Amazon, which reveals multiple books on the topic, and I quickly order one according to user reviews and ratings. This is the process that has occured time and time again, leading to a bookshelf full of books on varying programming topics. For many of these books, I have only just begun reading (or I got halfway through and was distracted by something else), and never fully gained an understanding of the topic that I set out to learn.

For these reasons, I found the problem statement of the Reading List pattern in Hoover and Oshineye’s Apprenticeship Patterns to be especially applicable to my current situation. The problem statement says, “The number of books you need to read is increasing faster than you can read them.” While I am constantly increasing my understanding of certain topics, new and improved methods are constantly being developed. Keeping up with the rapid pace at which software development changes is difficult, but following the advice of Hoover and Oshineye will undoubtedly give me a leg up on the competition. I like that the Reading List that they propose is essentially a priority queue, with the books that are most important at the top of the list and the ones that may not be as important towards the bottom.

It was reassuring to me to know that I was not alone in feeling overwhelmed by the amount of information that I need to attempt to gain an understanding of. The strategies in the Reading List pattern are sure to help me in organizing and creating a plan for learning new software development techniques and improving my skill set. Setting goals and prioritizing what I read will allow me to use books as a tool rather than simply being overwhelmed by what I don’t yet know.

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *