Software Development as an Art

Hoover and Oshineye make some excellent points that I strongly agree with in the Craft Over Art design pattern in Apprenticeship Patterns. Although I had never thought about software development in terms of art, I found their discussion of art versus fine art to be interesting and well supported. While it is relatively simple to argue that software development is a craft, I would imagine that claiming that it is art would generate a bit more controversy. In my opinion, Hoover and Oshineye do an excellent job of supporting their claims that software development, by nature of being a craft, is also an art – but not a fine art. The distinction that they make between craft and fine art has to do with purpose. Because software development’s purpose is to make a useful product for customers, it can be seen as utilitarian in a sense. The purpose of producing fine art is purely for beauty.

The important caveat that Hoover and Oshineye introduce in the Craft Over Art pattern is that the craft of software development may produce something beautiful, but it must produce something useful. This may mean that craftsmen must choose utility over beauty when it is necessary. Considering the interests of the customer over personal interests and balancing conflicting demands is important in building and maintaining strong relationships with the customer.

This pattern applies in a couple of ways to my current undertakings. The importance of creating software that addresses real problems for real people is something that is somewhat new to me. Writing code for AMPATH Informatics is exciting because of the real-world significance that my contributions have. The other place where this pattern applies is in my independent study web development project for Massachusetts HOSA. While the customer-development relationship is a bit different in both of these cases, many of the same tips from the Craft Over Art pattern apply. While I may not be paid for my services, I still have expectations placed on me by the instructors and organizations involved in these projects. Understanding and carefully considering my responsibility to deliver a product that is first and foremost useful will help me to foster strong relationships with the collaborators on these projects.

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