Writing Great Test Cases and Becoming a Great Software Tester

I completely agree with Kyle McMeekin when he states in a blog post titled “5 Manual Test Case Writing Hacks,” from April 11th, 2016, that it should come as no surprise that great software testers should have an eye for detail. What may not be as obvious, however, is that great software testers should be able to write great and effective test cases. McMeekin goes on to observe that writing effective test cases requires both talent and experience. In an attempt to begin my journey to become a great software tester, I decided that I should pay close attention to the advice offered by experienced testers as they reflect on the skills they have gained from their time in the industry. Hopefully, by following the tips of more experienced testers, I too will someday be able to contribute to highly valuable test cases the improve productivity and help to create high quality software.

The first step to writing great test cases is knowing what components make up the test case. While many of the components were obvious to me, there were others that I had not thought of. The test steps, for example, are important because the person performing the test may not be the same person who wrote the test. Knowing how the test should be performed is important to obtaining a valuable result from the test.

What I found most valuable about McMeekin’s post, however, were his tips on how to “write better test cases that will lead to better quality software for your company.” His first piece of advice is to keep test cases simple. They should be in simple language, and follow the company’s template. Although not specifically mentioned in this guide, I remember reading that if a test case seems to become too complex, you should begin considering breaking it up into smaller pieces. Second, McMeekin recommends making test cases reusable. Taking into consideration that your test cases could be adapted to other scenarios or reused in another application should help to develop test cases that are reusable. Third, McMeekin suggests placing yourself in the shoes of the tester or developer rather than the test-case writer, and being your own critic. Considering what parts of your test-case may be ambiguous or frustrating for others using them will often help to create better tests. This goes hand in hand with the fourth recommendation, which is to think about the end user. Understanding the expectations and desires of the end user will certainly help to create test cases that lead to better, more successful software. The last recommendation that McMeekin gives is to stay organized. This suggestion could apply just about anywhere, but with hundreds or possibly even thousands of potential test cases, staying organized is certainly essential to being a great tester.

Although I am sure there is a great deal more to consider in my quest to one day become a great software tester, I think that keeping these things in mind will certainly improve the quality of the test cases that I write. In the rapidly advancing field of computer science, I don’t feel that I will ever stop learning new and improved ways of doing things or further developing my skills.

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